Now Playing Tracks

instagram:

Above the Clouds at Nepal’s Tengboche Monastery

To see more photos and videos from the site in the Himalayas, explore the Tengboche Monastery location page.

3,867 meters (12,687 feet) above sea level and at the foot of the Himalayas stands Tengboche Monastery.

Built in 1916, the monastery sits in the Khumbu Valley of Sagarmatha National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s the final stop on the “Sacred Sites Trail Project,” a circular trail of 10 monasteries in Sagamatha that draws thousands of adventurous travelers from across the globe each year.

"The surrounding mountains are incredibly rugged monoliths of dark gray and white," says Jessica DiCarlo (@jessicadicarlo), one such adventurer who shared several photos on Instagram during her visit to Tengboche in November. “It really set the tone for the rest of my trek through the Himalayas.” In the end, she says, “it ended up being one of my favorite places on the Sacred Sites circuit. Sunny, freezing, gorgeous and with a lovely community of monks.”

instagram:

Exploring the Clifftop Ruins of Scotland’s Dunnottar Castle

For more photos and videos from the ruins, explore the Dunnottar Castle location page.

On Scotland’s northeast coast, the ruins of Dunnottar Castle keep silent watch over the North Sea. Thought to have been built around the sixth century as Dùn Fhoithear, the fortress occupies 1.4 hectares (3.5 acres) on a clifftop 50 meters (160 feet) above the rocky coast below. A national landmark since 1970, the castle draws local and visiting Instagrammers alike to its scenic views and rich history.

From the 13th through the 18th century, Dunnottar was the home of the Keith family, Earls Marischal of Scotland—custodians of the Honours of Scotland (the crown jewels, sword and scepter). When Charles II was crowned King in the Scottish Parliament during the height of the English Civil Wars, the crown jewels used during the coronation could not be returned to Edinburgh as Oliver Cromwell’s English forces advanced in the region. For safekeeping, they were carried to Dunnottar in sacks of wool, where they remained during Cromwell’s eight-month blockade of the castle. Though Cromwell was ultimately victorious in defeating the last remaining Scottish stronghold, the jewels were smuggled out and hidden under an old church in Kinneff where they remained until Charles II regained the throne in 1660.

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union